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Keynote Speakers - Bios and Abstracts

All presentations (PDF) and video (Echo360) that have been given permission to be made available, are shown below and in the details of the Keynote Speaker.

Doc Searls

President of The Searls Group and a fellow at the Center for Information Technology & Society (CITS,) University of California (Video only)

Alex 'Sandy' Pentland

Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Director of MIT Media Lab, and Toshiba Chair in Media Arts and Sciences (Video & PDF)

Malcolm Crompton

Managing Director of Information Integrity Solutions Pty Ltd and Australia’s third Federal Privacy Commissioner (Video & PDF)

Alessandro Acquisti

Associate Professor of Information Technology and Public Policy at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University (Permissions withheld)

Stephen England-Hall

Chief Executive Officer, Loyalty New Zealand and Board Member, Vice-Chancellor’s Advisory Board on Communications, University of Cambridge (Video & PDF)

Simone van der Hof

Chair in Law and Information Society at Leiden University, The Netherlands (Video only)

Hon Bill English

Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Finance (Video only)

John Edwards

New Zealand Privacy Commissioner (Video & PDF)

Hon Peter Dunne

Leader of United Future, MP for Ohariu (Video only)

Liz MacPherson

Government Statistician and Chief Executive of Statistics NZ (Video & PDF)

Rebecca Kitteridge

Director of Security, New Zealand Security Intelligence Service (Video only)


Doc Searls

DocSearls

Doc Searls is a journalist, columnist, and a widely read blogger. He is the author of The Intention Economy: When Customers Take Charge (Harvard Business Review Press, 2012), and co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto: The End of Business as Usual (Basic Books, 2000, 2010). He is also Senior Editor of Linux Journal, a fellow at the Center for Information Technology & Society at UC Santa Barbara, and founder and director of ProjectVRM at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University since 2006.
Currently, he is a visiting scholar at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at NYU.

Wikipedia bio: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Searls
Bio: http://searls.com/
Blog: http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/doc/

Kindly sponsored by Datacom
Datacom-sm

Title: Privacy is personal
video
Abstract: While privacy is a hot topic in the digital world, it’s not in the physical one. That’s because we’ve had about twenty years to develop privacy technologies and norms in the online world, and ten thousand years or more to do the same in the physical one. How will we create the digital equivalent of clothing, shelter, doors, windows, shades and other physical means for controlling how much we reveal to the world? And how will we develop the full respect for personal privacy on which civilized life depends? Hint: identity is key. So is anonymity.

Alex 'Sandy' Pentland

SandyPentland

Alex `Sandy’ Pentland has helped create and direct MIT’s Media Lab, the Media Lab Asia, and the Center for Future Health.  He chairs the World Economic Forum's Data Driven Development council, is Academic Director of the Data-Pop Alliance, and is a member of the Advisory Boards for Google, Nissan, Telefonica, the United Nations Secretary General, Monument Capital, and the Minerva Schools. 

In 2012 Forbes named Sandy one of the 'seven most powerful data scientists in the world’, along with Google founders and the CTO of the United States.  His most recent book is `Social Physics,' published by Penguin Press.

Title: Social Physics and the Big Data Society
ppt VIDEO
Abstract:
We have entered a Big Data world, where commerce, government, and cities are increasingly driven by the digital breadcrumbs that we leave behind as we go about our daily routine.  This brave new world has both great possibilities for a more sustainable, healthy world, but also the danger of more centralized, authoritarian power.  To ensure a better world we need to take back control of our digital identities, and create digital systems of transparency and accountability.  In this talk I will talk about the possibilities, both good and the bad, and what is being done to build a better world.

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Malcom Crompton

MalcolmCrompton

Malcolm Crompton is Managing Director of Information Integrity Solutions Pty Ltd (IIS),  a global consultancy specialising in data protection and privacy strategies. IIS works with companies to increase business value and customer trust and to ensure government meets the high standards expected in the handling of personal information.

As Australia’s Privacy Commissioner from 1999 to 2004, Malcolm led the implementation of private sector privacy law.  Malcolm’s global reputation is built on his forward thinking on the handling and governance of personal information. Malcolm’s expertise in privacy was recognised when the International Association of Privacy Professionals honoured him in Washington DC with the 2012 Privacy Leadership Award. Malcolm was founding President of iappANZ and has been a director of IAPP.

Kindly sponsored by Microsoft New Zealand
MS-Logo-Sm

Title: The more things change... The digital age and how it can work for us if we try
pdf 360
Abstract:
We live in an age in which every aspect of modern society is being transformed by the application of data. This is more than a digital transformation – with the rise of the Internet of Things, our lives are being shaped in the physical world as well. Data-driven technologies have immense potential to improve our lives as individuals, as a society and to create enormous economic gain.  They also have the potential to undermine not only our privacy, but our humanity as well. Malcolm examines where we are going and where we might want to be individually and as a society. As an optimist, Malcolm will give his insights into how we can have a large amount of the cake and eat it too and how getting on the right track may not be as difficult as we think.

Alessandro Acquisti

AlessandroAcquisit

Alessandro Acquisti is a Professor of Information Technology and Public Policy at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the co-director of CMU Center for Behavioral and Decision Research.  He investigates the economics of privacy. His studies have spearheaded the investigation of privacy and disclosure behavior in online social networks, and the application of behavioral economics to the study of privacy and information security decision making. Alessandro has been the recipient of the PET Award for Outstanding Research in Privacy Enhancing Technologies, the IBM Best Academic Privacy Faculty Award, the Heinz College School of Information's Teaching Excellence Award, and multiple Best Paper awards. He has testified before the U.S. Senate and House committees on issues related to privacy policy and consumer behavior, and has been a TED Global speaker. Alessandro's findings have been featured in national and international media outlets, including the Economist, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Financial Times, Wired.com, NPR, CNN, and 60 Minutes. His 2009 study on the predictability of Social Security numbers was featured in the “Year in Ideas” issue of the NYT Magazine (the SSNs assignment scheme was changed by the US Social Security Administration in 2011). Alessandro holds a PhD from UC Berkeley, and Master degrees from UC Berkeley, the London School of Economics, and Trinity College Dublin. He has held visiting positions at the Universities of Rome, Paris, and Freiburg (visiting professor); Harvard University (visiting scholar); University of Chicago (visiting fellow); Microsoft Research (visiting researcher); and Google (visiting scientist). He has been a member of the National Academies' Committee on public response to alerts and warnings using social media.

Title: Privacy in the Age of Augmented Reality (Presentation unavailable)

Abstract: I will present a series of results from studies and experiments investigating the economics of privacy, the behavioral economics of privacy, and privacy in online social networks.  The studies highlight surprising trade-offs that emerge from the protection or sharing of personal information, the inadequacy of "notice and consent" mechanisms for privacy protection, and the future of privacy in an augmented reality world in which online and offline personal data will seamlessly blend.

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Stephen England-Hall

StephenEnglandHall

Stephen England-Hall is CEO of Loyalty NZ,  the company behind the extremely successful Fly Buys programme and advanced data and analytics business LAB 360. He has extensive international experience – particularly in the UK and North America  - working as a senior executive of world leading digital marketing, data and technology companies. Including CMO of social media technology and data company Syncapse, and CEO of Razorfish UK.  Stephen also holds an MBA from Cambridge University.
He is a founding member of the New Zealand Data Futures Forum, working with government and private sector leaders on ways New Zealand can harness the power of a data-rich future to create economic value and social benefit.

Loyalty NZ is already leading the charge towards the future of customer marketing via multi-channel real-time loyalty platforms and data-driven contextual content – an experience that is totally customer centric and personalised. Stephen is a member of the Cambridge University Advisory Board on Alumni and Communication.

Title: It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it – the challenges of retaining control of your digital profile built on behaviours rather than facts.
pdf video
Abstract:
Our idea of identity has historically been a description based on the events, things and labels applied to us – like our date of birth, gender, or ethnicity.  In a connected world, our identity is increasingly linked to the choices we make and the actions we take - when and where we shop, who our friends are, and where we live and work and how we choose to play. Our identity is no longer just a description it’s increasingly becoming our story - a very personal story that is interpreted and used by others through the digital trail our actions leave behind.
The digital trail is often governed by the T&Cs we agree to in exchange for services and products that matter to us. But these conditions are usually weighted in favour of the business rather than the consumer. So how do we as consumers retain control of our profile, and manage our privacy in an environment like this?  And what are the responsibilities of the businesses and services who capitalise on capturing and using these digital profiles?
Stephen England Hall will explore these ideas, from the point of view of the consumer, the business and the New Zealand Data Futures Forum, of which he is member.

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Simone van der Hof


SimoneVanDerHof

Simone van der Hof holds the chair of Law and the Information Society at Leiden University, where she is the head of the Center for Law and Digital Technologies (eLaw). She is also the programme director of the Master of Laws Advanced Studies programme in Law and Digital Technologies at Leiden Law School. Simone’s particular academic interest is in the field of online privacy, data protection and privacy statements, digital government and the rule of law, digital child rights, regulation of online child safety, and empowerment of individuals through technology. She teaches the courses ‘Digital government’ and ‘Digital child rights’ in the Advanced Master on Law and Digital Technologies, the course ‘Regulating online child safety’ in the Master on Youth Law and the course ‘Children’s rights in the digital world’ in the to-be accredited Advanced Master on Children’s Rights. Recently, she finished a four-year multidisciplinary project on cyberbullying and a EU project on consumer sentiment regarding privacy on user generated content services in the digital economy (CONSENT). Currently, she participates in an EU project on online privacy and identity for children (Dynamic Identity). Simone is part of the EU Kids Online Dutch research team (http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline) and a member of the NICAM complaints committee dealing with complaints on age classification for television and movies (‘De Kijkwijzer’).

Title: The rights of the child in the digital world
video
Abstract: Since its entry into force more than 25 years ago, the UN Convention on the rights of the child has continuously become more important in ensuring the well-being of children worldwide. More recently, there’s is an increasing awareness that the fundamental rights put forward by the Convention are essential in how caregivers, policymakers and regulators take their responsibilities in a time when children and young people are spending increasingly more time online. This keynote will explore a number of topics related to child safety, identity and development on the internet — i.e. online grooming, cyberbullying and privacy — through the lens of the rights of the child. The UN Convention is not just a declaration of human rights but is a comprehensive treaty that integrates developmental, social and legal perspectives on how to guarantee the well-being of children. This allows to take a more balanced approach to online risks that easily give rise to moral panics or to bring urgency to those issues that might need more of our attention.

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Hon Bill English


BillEnglishPhoto

Hon Bill English is the Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Finance (roles he has held since 2008) and the Minister Responsible for Housing New Zealand Corporation. He was first elected to Parliament in 1990 as MP for the Wallace electorate (later re-named Clutha-Southland) and served as the local MP for 24 years until he became a list MP in 2014.
Mr English has held ministerial posts in regulatory reform, education, health, revenue and finance and he was leader of the National Party from October 2001 to October 2003.

video

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John Edwards

JohnEdwards

John Edwards was appointed to the independent statutory position of Privacy Commissioner in February 2014 for a term of five years. He provides independent comment on significant personal information policies and issues. He intends to take every opportunity to promote privacy and good personal information handling practices to various audiences around New Zealand. Prior to his appointment, John practiced law in Wellington for over 20 years specialising in information law while representing a wide range of public and private sector clients. He has acted in legal roles for the Ministry of Health, State Services Commission, Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet and Inland Revenue Department. For 15 years, he held a warrant as a district inspector for mental health and has also been a district inspector for intellectual disability services.

Title: The New “I AM”: Identity and anonymity in an untrusting world
pdf video
Abstract:
In a world of constant connection, identity is becoming less fluid; we are tying ourselves ever tighter to our pasts.  Facilitating anonymity is one answer, but is it the best one?  And if we achieve a world where anonymity is effortless and free, what will that mean for the intricate web of systems we rely on every day? 

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Hon Peter Dunne

PeterDunne

 

video

Hon Peter Dunne, born in Christchurch in 1954, graduated from the University of Canterbury in 1977 with a Master of Arts degree with Honours in Political Science, and has also studied business administration at Massey University.
He worked for the Department of Trade and Industry in Wellington during 1977-78, prior to joining the Alcoholic Liquor Advisory Council holding various posts up to 1984. He has been a Member of Parliament since 1984, holding the north-west Wellington seats of Ohariu; Onslow; Ohariu-Belmont and Ohariu.
Mr Dunne has held the roles of Parliamentary Under-Secretary in the fields of Health (1987-89); Trade and Industry (1987-89); Energy (1988-89); Regional Development (1988-90); Commerce (1988-90); Justice (1989); Environment (1989-90); Internal Affairs (1989-90); and Local Government (1989-90). Mr Dunne was appointed Minister of Internal Affairs for the first time in 1995, Minister of Revenue and Associate Minister of Health from 2005 to 2013, and also Associate Minister of Conservation between 2011 and 2013. He has been appointed Minister of Internal Affairs, Associate Minister of Health and Associate Minister of Conservation since January 2014.
He has also written two books: "Home is Where My Heart Is", published in 2002, and "In the Centre of Things", published in 2005.

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Liz MacPherson

LizMacpherson

Liz MacPherson is a public servant with 24 years’ experience, including a decade working at senior leadership level in the public sector. The breadth and scope of Liz’s experience brings a new perspective to her role as the Government Statistician. Liz is passionate about evidence-driven decision-making and sees her role is to ensure New Zealand decision-makers at all levels have access to quality information. “Statistics are only valuable if people use them. We collect and analyse them, and it’s vital we make them available in the ways people want them.”

Liz was appointed to the role of Government Statistician and Chief Executive of Statistics NZ in August 2013. Before joining Statistics NZ, Liz held several senior roles over a 20-year period at the Department of Labour, the Ministry of Economic Development (MED), and more recently the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). As a Deputy Secretary and member of the Executive Leadership Team at MED, Liz led three branches, covering various policy and regulatory areas including tourism, consumer affairs, major events, regulatory policy, small- and medium-sized enterprises, environmental regulation, and energy safety. Liz was Acting Chief Executive of MED in the lead-up to MBIE’s formation. As a member of the new MBIE Establishment Executive Leadership Team, she led the Labour part of the MBIE ‘federation’. When the new MBIE structure was introduced in November 2012, Liz became MBIE’s Deputy Chief Executive Strategy and Governance. This role involved shaping MBIE’s strategy and direction and responsibility for the Government’s Business Growth Agenda and MBIE’s Canterbury Economic Recovery work. Liz joined the public sector with a strong appetite to make a difference. Despite being a self-confessed geek, she is very much a people person with a strong pragmatic side. She enjoys spending time with her family, cooking, and sharing good food with friends and family. In her (rare) spare time, Liz coaches netball, and as a trained opera singer has been known to shine during organisational Christmas carol performances.

Title: Clever or creepy - Is it time to put some sunlight on data use?
pdf video
Abstract:
Information about people is the life blood of a national statistics office.  As the Government Statistician and Chief Executive of Statistics NZ, Liz MacPherson is acutely aware of the need to maintain the highest standards for managing personal information while keeping the dimensions that can inform and create value.

In an enlightening talk about how Statistics NZ maintains this balance, Liz will discuss what she sees as key issues on the horizon. She’ll challenge attendees to start thinking about the need for an informed conversation with the NZ public about data – how it’s collected, stored, protected (or not), shared and, importantly, used.  Liz will explore what the concept of ‘social licence’ really means and test the potential gains a ‘dialogue about data’ with the New Zealand public might bring. 

Showcasing Statistics NZ’s Integrated Data Infrastructure as a tangible and credible example of how anonymised and confidentialised data can be safely shared, Liz will also test whether data debates have focused too much on privacy risk and not enough on the value that can be created.

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Rebecca Kitteridge

RKitteridge

Ms Rebecca Kitteridge was appointed Director of Security in May 2014.
Rebecca came to the NZSIS after six years as Secretary of the Cabinet and Clerk of the Executive Council, within the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. She served under four Prime Ministers and four Governors-General in that role and in earlier roles in DPMC. Rebecca has also worked in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and started her career with nine years in the private sector.
Rebecca has a legal background, and has professional experience in public sector leadership, the effective operation of democracy, the constitution, the rule of law, ethics and good process. She sees a secure state and a well-informed government as fundamental in supporting and maintaining the New Zealand way of life. In March 2014, Rebecca was appointed as a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order, in recognition of her service to the Queen as Cabinet Secretary and Clerk of the Executive Council.

Title: Is the NZSIS interested in you? Privacy in the security world
video
Abstract: Rebecca’s presentation will canvas an issue that has been attracting a lot of comment and column inches in recent times: whether intelligence agencies are interested in the activities of everyday New Zealanders.
There are current buzz words that all but guarantee headlines and multiple commentators through a range of media.  Terms like mass surveillance, extra powers and spies.  Security and privacy are often promoted as conflicting values when in fact they are complementary and must be considered together.
But are these themes really a reflection of what the public is interested in, or is concerned about?  Rebecca will share insights on what she has learnt in her time as the Director of Security, including privacy considerations and implications for security agencies in our connected world.

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